North Korea refuses to Give Up Nuclear Ambitions

Kim II

Louice Tapper Jansson,

Correspondent (Politics)

PYONGYANG - North Korea has kept on going with their Nuclear Arms program, despite the protest of the surrounding world. Upon recent nuclear explosion tests, the world community has imposed even more severe sanctions on the isolated country. This has not deterred the communist leadership.

Kim Jong-Un, new leader of North Korea, has said that the country is in a state of war. The communist leader has threatened to fire off medium range missiles that supposedly could hit South Korea, Japan and United States bases.

On Thursday, it was announced that the missiles would be moved to the eastern coast of North Korea. The US has prepared itself to respond to a possible attack. According to The Guardian it is necessary to take these military threats seriously.

The international community does not believe that the provocations will lead to a full scale conflict, despite taking the statements seriously. BBCs Lucy Williamson said that going through with their threats would mean national ‘suicide’ for North Korea.

According to the BBC the intention of the military threats could be to bully the international community into lifting sanctions and give economic aid. This, however, appears to be a ‘game of the past’.

“The international community thought the nuclear program was a bargaining chip for North Korea,” said Williamson.

There have been suggestions that Kim Jong Un needs to establish his authority by showing that he is a strong leader after his father’s death. The military threats could thus be a part of an internal power struggle. Also, as the country is struck by poverty and hunger, the leadership wants to unite the people towards a common enemy to make them to forget their troubles.

North Korea’s own news agency KCNA gives another side of the story. The common message here is that the nation risks being attacked by the imperialist US.

United Nations chief Ban Ki Moon, who is also from South Korea, said North Korea has ‘gone too far’ but that he is looking for a peaceful solution, BBC News reports.

Image Courtesy: yousukezan (http://www.flickr.com/photos/yousukezan/7878645542/)

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Louice Tapper Jansson

Louice Tapper Jansson

Louice Tapper Jansson is a politics correspondent from Stockholm, Sweden. In July 2013 she graduated with a BA in Journalism, Media and Sociology from Cardiff University. She has a major interest in European and World politics. She is currently enrolled at a professional journalism course at Uppsala University in Sweden. Follow her on Twitter @marilynandi.

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